Turkey Pan Cake:

Turkey Pan Cake:

Prep:           5 mins.

Cooking:      15 – 20 mins.

Course:        Snack/Lunch/Main

Serves:        AMAR

Rating:         2:  Easy

This recipe is flexible.  Obviously, the more leftover turkey you have, the more meals it will make.  Vary the quantities as necessary.  Use your brain – it will work, honest.

Find

  • Red onion
  • Red pepper
  • Pre-cooked potatoes
  • Olive oil
  • Cooked turkey
  • Eggs – see text
  • Seasonings
  • Optional: Bacon rashers
  • Optional: Dollop of crème Fraiche
  • Optional: Fresh tarragon (if you can nick some from a neighbour’s garden – what about that pretty young missy down the road, her front garden has all sorts of…..)

Method

  • Slice the red onion very thinly, halve the red pepper, remove the seeds and discard them, chopping the flesh into thin strips.
  • Cube the cooked potatoes and fry everything prepared so far in a non-stick frying pan over a fairly low heat using olive oil. Keep it all moving now and again.
  • Whilst these are browning, put the turkey and finely chopped tarragon (if you have it – otherwise use dried tarragon sparingly, or mixed herbs – or leave out altogether) into a mixing bowl, mix and season to taste.
  • Add the eggs (1 per person) to the bowl and combine well. If the onions, etc have browned, put a little more oil in the pan and tip in the mixture, spreading it all over the pan evenly and stir in.
  • The mixture will form a crust on the underside. Let it.  You need it to form the crust so that you can turn it over of the without breaking it all up, as you want it to emerge as one complete pan cake.
  • If you have bacon, grill it until crispy and if you have crème Fraiche, have it ready to plop onto the side of the plate with the bacon and a neatly cut lump of turkey pan cake.

Cheesy Turkey Burgers:

Cheesy Turkey Burgers: 

(This recipe may be made with any meat, but we’ll use turkey for now).

This recipe is flexible.  If you only have a little turkey left over it will feed less people than if a lot of meat is available.  Thus, you will need to vary the quantities as necessary. 

Use your brain – it will work, honest.  The recipe, that is; I don’t know about your brain!

Prep:           10 mins.

Cooking:      15 mins.

Course:        Snack/Lunch/Main

Serves:        See text

Rating:         2:  Easy

 

Find:

  • Left-over cooked turkey (or whatever meat you have)
  • Onion
  • Hard cheese (no, ol’ feller, that’s not a comment, it’s an ingredient),  grated
  • Worcester sauce, as you have cheese….
  • Garlic
  • An egg
  • A little flour (Flour, that is; not flowers!)
  • Seasoning
  • Optional – Whole grain mustard
  • Oil (Avoid Teak, Castor, Engine, Body, Baby……)
  • Burger Baps (bread rolls)
  • Tomatoes & Salad as required
  • A Wally (that’s a gherkin for those uninitiated in the fascinating world of the Wally)
  • Sauces; ketchup, mayo, brown sauce, mustard……..
  • Food processor
  • Frying pan

METHOD:

  • Put the onion (coarsely hacked just to give it a start) and the turkey into the food processor with the Worcester sauce, seasoning, egg, whole grain mustard and half of the cheese.
  • Process (blitz) the contents to a thick consistency.
  • Sprinkle a little flour onto a cleaned surface; take a handful of the paste, firstly making a ball and then pressing it into a burger shape (not too thick) on the floured surface.
  • Your aim is to make burger shapes (they can be square ones if you are using sandwich bread instead of rolls) of the paste, lightly dusted with flour. (Make ‘em elephant shape if you wish….. or if you have what we know as ‘bridge rolls’ around here, shape them in a penile fashion…..! )
  • Fry these in oil for 3 to 4 minutes each side then take them out, load them with the cheese (and more Worcester sauce), transferring them to the grill to have the cheese gooified (or just carefully return them to the pan, turned down to the lowest heat, if you haven’t a grill – or are just too lazy to put it on….).
  • Serve them in baps or bread with whatever salad, sauces, etc you would like.
  • Take that, Makkidoos! (coarse reference to a certain fast food chain….or even ALL fast…….)

Chicken (or turkey) & ginger on spinach:

Chicken (or turkey) & ginger on spinach:

Prep:           2 mins.

Cooking:      15 mins.

Course:        Main

Serves:         2

Rating:         3:  Moderate

This is a steam/stir-fry dish.       The steam/stir-fry is a bit of a cheat (well, there’s a surprise), in that you let the poultry cook in its own steam whilst you get on with something else (probably down the pub or trying to get your wicked way with the opposite-sex) before you do the stir-fry bit.  Clever, eh?    

However, it’s actually a good way of saving a bit of energy, as while the pan is turned off but hot, using the accumulated heat inside the lidded pan, it’s not costing you any money in gas/electric/coal/wood/peat/horse dung…

Find for two people:

  • 2 chicken breasts or Turkey breast fillets or slices
  • 2” (5cm) fresh ginger root, peeled & finely grated
  • 1 red onion
  • 3 fresh carrots
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • Half a conventional red/yellow/orange pepper (a bell pepper/capsicum)
  • Packet of fresh baby spinach leaves – or even freshly picked new crop spinach cadged from your neighbour’s allotment (remember always to be around the allotment when there is a glut of anything fresh – you can do them a favour by using it – saves it going to waste)
  • A knob of butter
  • Frying pan with lid
  • Colander
  • Saucepan

Method:

  • Peel the red onion, cutting, not chopping, into rustic sized bits, peel and slice the carrots into half inch (15mm) long chunks as this is a chunky-type dish.
  • Throw those into a hot frying pan (with lid, but don’t use the lid yet……) with some olive/groundnut/vegetable/sunflower oil and turn down the heat to a gentle warming. Let the contents fry, but not aggressively, for about ten minutes or so.  They must not burn.  You are ensuring that the carrots will be cooked and the onions nice’n’soft.
  • Wash the spinach leaves in the colander and let them drain.
  • Cut up the chicken/turkey breast into big chunks (a size just about manageable to eat with a fork – according to size of mouth), cutting the pepper into long thin strips.
  • Cut/peel the outer skin from the root ginger and grate most of it finely. Some ginger can be sliced into thin slices, and then cut the slices into very thin strips, like the pepper (Julienne).
  • Peel the garlic (see Tricks’n’Tips for the easy way…).
  • Throw all this into the pan and stir around for a mo. Turn up the heat and fry the chicken/turkey until just starting to show signs of browning.  Don’t allow the garlic to start to burn at all – it turns bitter.
  • Put in a quarter of a cup of boiling water from the kettle, bring to the boil and put on the lid. Turn off the heat.
  • Let it sit there and cook whilst you do something more interesting for a while (20 mins +, or on your return from the pub).
  • When you get around to thinking about cooking again, put strong heat under the frying pan until the water has just boiled away, turning it down to a medium heat for the stir-fry stage.
  • Stir-fry the meat mixture in the frying pan for a few minutes and, at the same time, pop a knob of butter into another saucepan and put onto a gentle heat (yes, you can do ‘do-it-at-the-same-time’ cooking).
  • Put the baby spinach leaves into the saucepan and stir them about a bit. Yes, they will all fit – spinach just vanishes like the pound in your wallet as it wilts.                                                                               Put more in, you’ll need it.  Come on….  
  • You’ll see that it just reduces down to a lovely lush, dark green veg… oooooh, wonderful. The buttery liquid produced in the spinach saucepan (give the spinach a good squeeeeeeeze) should be drained into the meat mixture and stirred in.  Ready to plate up?
  • So, put a dollop of the lovely spinach in the middle of the plate and serve the meat mixture onto it, allowing it to spill over onto one side of the plate so that the spinach bed is still quite visible. Just for prettiness.

Now, just you make sure that you do the washing up straight after you’ve finished the eatin’ of it.  Yes?

Cheep Chicken/Turkey Casserole 2: (Peasant’s Poultry Pot)

Cheep Chicken/Turkey Casserole 2:  (Peasant’s Poultry Pot)

Prep:           10 mins.

Cooking:      2 hrs.

Course:        Main

Serves:        See text

Rating:         3:  Moderate

Find:

  • Cheap chicken quarters, one per person + one extra

( Ah yes, now this is quite sensible advice – if you are making this using turkey, don’t buy one quarter of a turkey for each person…… use turkey thighs instead – just thought I’d better say, otherwise you might find that you’ve over-catered; just slightly).

  • A couple or more red onions (or onions of any other colour, should you wish…. Found any blue ones?)
  • Garlic – probably about one clove per person.
  • A cheap can of tomatoes, or two if making the meal for 4 people +.
  • Mixed herbs (Provencal if possible)
  • A tablespoonful of flour
  • Oven tin
  • Saucepan
  • Oven dish

You’ll need one cheap chicken quarter per person, plus one extra, so for four people use five quarters.  You can actually use turkey instead, or even make a combined chicken & turkey casserole.  Turkey drumsticks are quite cheap, but they do need a bit more preparation (see Tricks’n’Tips for how to deal with a turkey drumstick) as they have an amount of stiff bone-like bits to deal with after it has been oven-cooked.

 

Method:

  • No need to do anything to the meat before popping the quarters/turkey legs into a deep oven tin, they’ll get all the attention they need when they’ve been cooked for the first time.
  • Drizzle the meat with a little water and oil (don’t drown them) and oven-cook for about 45 minutes on gas 4-5, just checking occasionally that they’re not burning. They should roast nicely, producing their own juices.
  • Get them out of the oven and put them onto a cold plate to cool. It may help to speed the cooling process by pulling them apart using two forks back to back and levering apart…….

(oh yes, and you can use this same method in the garden when dividing the rootballs of perennial plants in the winter to propagate more plants and make your garden all nice and summery, in the summer – when else? – but you don’t use table forks for that job, ‘cos they’d bend; you’d have to use two use garden forks…… er  ……  I think that I’m digressing again; I can see the glazed look in your eyes….ooops)

  • ………or simply pulling some bones out, generally allowing the heat to escape.
  • While they are cooking or cooling off (depending on how urgent the meal is – and how organised you are) you should prepare the veggie bits for the casserole.
  • Peel the onions (see Tricks’n’Tips) and slice, not chop them to leave large chunks.
  • Peel the garlic, crushing slightly with a wide bladed knife to aid skin removal, and chop finely.
  • In a pot or casserole dish suitable for use on the hob as well as in the oven (Le Creuset, or similar) start to soften the red onions in about a tablespoon (a good glug) of olive oil over a medium flame.
  • Peel the carrots cutting them into inch-long chunks and throwing them in with the onions to cook gently for about five minutes.
  • Add the flour and mix to make a roux to thicken the dish.
  • Turn up the heat, open a cheap (supermarket ‘Value’) can of tomatoes and pop them into the pan before it gets too hot, just squashing the whole ones so that they cook down in the oven.
  • Add a few good pinches of Mick’s Terbs (see Tricks’n’Tips) and give it all a good stir. If you have any, add a good and generous dollop of tomato puree (see Tricks’n’Tips) from a jar or a good long squeeze from a tube.
  • Pull the flesh from the chicken bones with your best-washed fingers. If it doesn’t pull off, it’s either bone or something else grotty.  You can put in all of the flesh straight into the pot, as long as you don’t include the skin or anything like the cartilage from the ends of the bones.  Certainly salvage the brown messy bit found next to the chicken backbone as it flavours the casserole beautifully.  Try to keep the flesh in quite large chunks.
  • If you are using turkey instead as or as well as the chicken, pull the flesh off the drumstick whilst feeling carefully for the stiff bone-like bits that are to be found within the flesh. Pull these stiff bits off the ends of the muscles they are connected to – they will come away if you do each one in turn.  You might prefer to use a knife but it really is best to pull it away.  You do not want to discover these bits in the final casserole, believe me.  Go on; get yer ‘ands mucky
  • Give it all a good stir, perhaps adding just a little water or even left over wine of whatever colour to almost cover the contents of the pot. You don’t want too much fluid.  If you have the stock jelly from a cup you’ve poured unwanted fat into previously (see Tricks’n’Tips), now is the time to stir that in too.  Don’t add any salt yet as you might overdo it.  Try it later.
  • The oven is already hot, so cover the pot and put it in at about gas mark 5 for an hour. Don’t worry about it, disturb it, check it or otherwise concern yourself.  It’ll just sit there cooking nicely.  Look after your guests as they arrive – they’ll wonder how you’ve managed to be so dammed organised – as long as the house is clean and tidy.              It is, isn’t it?
  • After the hour has passed, give it a good stir with a wooden spoon and taste the liquid with a teaspoon (remembering that each taste you make needs a fresh spoon, as you don’t want to put the spoon you’ve just put into your gob straight back into the pot, do you?) If you wish, you can add a chicken stock cube or a veggie one, or both if the pot is for a number of people or just add salt.

Remember that stock cubes normally contain salt, so only add salt after you’ve finished with the stock cubes and tasted it to see if further seasoning is necessary. 

  • Whatever you do, don’t forget to add good ground black pepper as this will bring flavours to the fore and add life.
  • After you’ve cleaned the outside of the pot with a damp bit of kitchen roll, give the pot a little time on the hob, just simmering on the lowest of low heat whilst your guests seat themselves and then take off the lid and put it on a heatproof mat in the middle of the table.
  • Serve with roast veg, new spuds with their coats on, baked spuds in their jackets…. whatever you like.

Just enjoy, sit there and modestly accept the praise that will come your way:  “Oh this? . . ..It’s just something I threw together today…”

Fried Pepper Chicken Pieces:

Fried Pepper Chicken Pieces:

PICTURE 18

Prep:           5 mins.

Cooking:      20 mins  + .

Course:        Main

Serves:        4

Rating:         3:  Moderate – but you do need to ensure that the chicken is thoroughly cooked.

Find:

  • 4 chicken portions – normally leg quarters
  • Flour
  • Seasoning – you could use black/green/red peppercorns cracked in a pestle & mortar
  • Oil
  • Frying pan

Method:

  • Trim the fat and loose skin from the edges and underneath.
  • Split the skin between the thigh and what would be the body of the chicken if it was a whole chicken – but of course it’s not – and pour a little oil in the gap.
  • Mix a little flour, a good amount of ground black pepper (no, don’t skimp with the pepper….. more than that…. It is pepper chicken after all….) and a little salt in a mug, mix well and turn out onto a plate.
  • Roll the chicken pieces in the seasoned flour ensuring that they are fully coated all over – back and front.
  • Heat a frying pan, add a little oil and put the chicken in.
  • Keep the frying pan on quite a low heat for 20 minutes, turning the chicken over every five, basting it occasionally with the juices from the pan. You can keep an eye on the pan to avoid it burning as you will be doing the veg whilst the chicken is cooking.
  • Inspect the chicken to see if there is any evidence of red at all in the joints. If so, cook a little longer – chicken has to be thoroughly cooked through.  If in any doubt, pop it into the microwave for 1 or 2 minutes to make sure; you must not serve chicken meat that is still red.
  • Serve with chips and a nice light chicken gravy!

Fried Mustard Chicken Pieces:

Fried Mustard Chicken Pieces:

Prep:           5 mins.

Cooking:      20 mins  + .

Course:        Main

Serves:        4

Rating:         3:  Moderate – but you do need to ensure that the chicken is thoroughly cooked.

Find:

  • 4 chicken portions – normally leg quarters
  • Whole grain mustard
  • Oil
  • Seasoning
  • Pastry brush if you have one – if not, use a clean finger
  • Frying pan

Method:

  • Trim the fat and loose skin from the edges and underneath.
  • Split the skin between the thigh and the body of the chicken and pour a little oil in the gap.
  • Mix a little oil and a dollop of whole grain mustard in a mug and paint the skin and the underside of the chicken with the mixture.
  • Heat a frying pan, add a little oil and put the chicken in.
  • Keep the frying pan on quite a low heat for 20 minutes, turning the chicken over every five, basting it occasionally with the juices from the pan. You can keep an eye on the pan to avoid it burning as you will be doing the veg whilst the chicken is cooking.
  • After 20 mins, Inspect the chicken to see if there is any evidence of red at all in the joints. If so, cook a little longer – chicken has to be thoroughly cooked through.  If in any doubt, pop it into the microwave for 2 minutes to make sure.
  • Serve with mash & veg?

Turkey & Mushroom Pie:

Photo:  Chris Wiles Photgraphy

Turkey & Mushroom Pie:

 (Could use chicken, but then it would be chicken & mushroom pie……..  I used a mixture, so that was Churkey & Mushroom Pie!)

Prep:           20 mins.

Cooking:      30 mins, plus any cooking of the turkey/chicken

Course:        Main

Serves:        6-8

Rating:         3:  Moderate

This is a great way to use up Xmas turkey – a good New Year’s recipe.    A pie needs a lid.    A lid is normally puff pastry.    Don’t be put off by that pastry thing, as you can buy chilled, ready-made, ready rolled-up puff pastry.  Don’t try making your own because it simply is not worth the time, cost or the effort.  Life’s too short to make pastry!

Find:

  • Pack of ready-made puff-pastry from your supermarket chiller (it may be in a block – or even better, in a rolled-up sheet)
  • 500g turkey pieces – could be turkey breast or thigh meat. Alternatively, use chicken thighs.  If the meat is uncooked, cook it before putting it in the pie – see the method.
  • Onion or two
  • Can of Bachelors/Campbell’s condensed cream of chicken or cream of mushroom soup
  • If you can cadge ‘em from somewhere, a dozen capers (optional, but they do make it nicer…. Make it two dozen)
  • 500g mushrooms
  • Egg or milk as a surface wash for the pastry
  • Rolling pin (see Tricks’n’Tips for how to roll out pastry, and how to use a lemonade bottle instead of a rolling pin – not necessary if you use rolled-up pastry!)
  • Oven dish
  • Frying pan

Method:

  • If the turkey/chicken is not already cooked, oven-cook (180 C) it under foil or a lid in a little oil and tablespoon of seasoned water for 40-50 mins.
  • Cool and remove the meat from the bones (see Tricks’n’Tips for the best way to remove the meat from a turkey drumstick).
  • Heat a little oil in the frying pan and add coarsely chopped onion then the cooked meat, the contents of the soup can (remember to rinse it out using a very tiny amount of water and pop that in too) and the capers (squashed with a fork) as well.
  • Wipe the mushrooms if dirty, then slice them and pop them into the meat mixture. Mix it all up.  (Never wash mushrooms)
  • Season to taste. Pour it all into the oven dish.

How to deal with a block of ready-made pastry: 

  • Firstly, clean the surface on which you intend to do your rolling-out. Remember that you are going to eat the stuff that you are about to spread and slide all over this surface, so make the surface really clean – and remember, also, that you don’t want to taste the cleaner you’ve used either – so make sure it’s dried well too.  You could use a plastic pastry rolling-out sheet if you had one.  Don’t worry, the cleaned surface is fine.
  • Sprinkle a little flour onto the beautifully cleaned, now dry surface that you intend to roll out onto, place the block of read-made pastry in the centre, sprinkling a little more flour on top.
  • Use a rolling pin (or a lemonade bottle devoid of label, glue and muck; shaken up to full pressure so that it is hard – we used to use a milk bottle years ago) to exert a light pressure on the pastry as it rolls over. This will make it expand away from you.
  • Lift the pastry, turn it though 90 degrees and turn it over and roll again. This will roll it out the other way, again away from you, ensuring that the rolling out is even.  Lift, turn, turn over again, sprinkle more flour and carry on doing this until the pastry is about 8mm thick.  It should be far larger than your oven dish by now – don’t worry about it.
  • Put the rolling pin on the pastry and roll it all up ONTO the rolling pin to transport it to the oven dish – and unroll it into position.

Of course, if you have bought ready rolled-out pastry in a roll, all of the above has already been done for you!

  • Use a knife to slice the excess pastry from around the edges of the oven dish and roll the excess into a ball.

(The excess pastry can be pressed into a ball, wrapped in cling film and popped into the freezer, ready for use in something else later).

  • Press a fork lightly all around the edges, sealing the lid to the side of the oven dish. CAUTION!….The contents will heat up and cause pressure to rise in the dish, so use the knife or scissors to cut or snip a couple of air vents in the pastry.
  • Either milk-wash the surface of the puff-pastry using a pastry brush if you have one (use a clean finger if you have not) or beat an egg in a mug and wash with that. Milk costs less but doesn’t look quite so good.
  • Put the oven dish on an oven tray to catch the overspill (saves cleaning the oven).
  • Oven bake for 30 mins around gas Mk 5 or until the lid looks good enough to eat – ‘cos it is.
  • Serve with whatever you fancy – it suits spuds and veg to my mind. If you want to have it with flied lice, it’s your choice!

Turkey leg cubes:

Turkey leg cubes:

Prep:           5 mins.

Cooking:      30 mins.

Course:        Main

Serves:         2

Rating:         2:  Easy

A quick’n’easy main that looks good but won’t strain the wallet muscles.

Find:

  • Turkey thigh (far better than turkey breast meat as far as I’m concerned – alternatively, use left-over turkey)
  • Red onion
  • Peas and other frozen veg – perhaps even baby sweetcorn
  • Batchelors/Campbells condensed cream of mushroom/chicken soup – one or the other
  • Seasoning
  • Frying pan
  • Oven dish

Method:

  • Cube the turkey to about 1-2cm size, roughly cut the red onion and fry the pair together, to start off the cooking process.
  • When the turkey starts to brown, put peas and other frozen veg into the pan and add a can of condensed soup.
  • Don’t add water, but rinse the can out with a tablespoon of milk (hand over the open end, shake, pour into the pan).
  • When it’s all hot, pour it all into the oven dish and pop into a pre-heated oven at gas mk 4 for 20 minutes.
  • Serve with new spuds or a lovely, smooth butter bean purée.
  • It doesn’t sound much but it really does the biz.

Popcorn Chicken:

Popcorn Chicken:

Ah!   Now this is DIFFERENT

You MUST certainly read the whole recipe before you embark on this journey……

 

I received this rather unusual recipe by email from a friend who is not known for her prowess in the kitchen, so I was more than a little surprised when it arrived.       A different roast chicken recipe with amazing results:       Thank you, Janet.  I have reproduced it just as you sent it to me.

(You should know at this point that I have not yet actually tested this recipe;…..I really must try it out when can I summon up the courage.…..)

Prep:           10 mins.

Cooking:      For duration in the oven, see method.

Course:        Main

Serves:         2-4   (If they are good at cricket or baseball)

Rating:         2:  Easy (Well, it must be easy if this friend says it is………..!)

A chicken recipe that uses popcorn?        This is what she sent to me:

When I found this recipe, I thought it was perfect for people like me, who are not sure how to tell when poultry is thoroughly cooked, but not dried out.

Give this a try.

Find:

  • 1 chicken of whatever size you wish, to feed 4
  • 1 cup melted butter
  • 1 cup Popcorn (unpopped)
  • 1 cup stuffing
  • Seasoning

METHOD:

  • Preheat oven to 220 degrees.
  • Brush chicken well with melted butter, salt and pepper.
  • Fill cavity with stuffing mixed with the popcorn.
  • Place in baking pan with the neck end toward the back of the oven. Close the door.  (This is starting to sound suspicious…..)
  • Listen for the popping sounds.
  • When the chicken’s arse blows the oven door open and the chicken flies across the room and lands on the table, it’s done and ready to eat.
  • Serve with pride!

And you thought I couldn’t cook ……..!

 

Hmmmmm…. Perhaps I was wrong to include this recipe?

Ham stuffed Chicken breast:

Ham stuffed Chicken breast:

Prep:           10 mins.

Cooking:      30 mins.

Course:        Main

Serves:         2

Rating:         2:  Easy

As the ‘Goat’s cheese stuffed……..’, but use ham and a little Philly cheese just to keep it moist.